OrthoVirginia Blog

Running Shoes

 

 

Helpful Tips to Buy Running or Walking shoes

 

As the snow melts and the excitement builds of hope to return to spending time outdoors,

 

purchasing running or walking shoes is an important first step. With the Monument 10K

 

approaching fast and other races appearing on the calendar, selecting the appropriate

 

shoes is vital to prevent injury. Listed below are some helpful tips when planning to buy

 

new shoes:

 

Ten Point Guide to buying a pair of running shoes *

 

1. Make sure you have plenty of time, and don’t rush. Research from the Medical

 

College of Wisconsin shows that the wrong shoes may play a role in the

 

development of stress fractures.

 

2. Go to a specialist running shop where the staff members are experienced in fitting

 

running shoes. It helps if they are runners, too.

 

3. Go later in the day when your feet are slightly larger to ensure you get a good fit.

 

4. Take your old shoes with you so that the staff can look at your wear patterns.

 

5. Wear appropriate clothing so that you can try out the shoes properly. Many shops

 

have treadmills to look at how you run and for you to test the shoes on.

 

6. Take your running socks with you. If you wear orthotics, bring them too.

 

7. Make sure that the shoes are comfortable in the shop. If they are not, they won’t

 

be for running.

 

8. Don’t be swayed by appearances or brands. Try on several makes and models

 

9. Don’t go by what your friend wears as they may run completely differently than

 

you or have a different foot type.

 

10. Be prepared to invest. Shoes will last 300-500 miles, so it is worth spending more

 

to get a decent pair, rather than opting for the bargain bin!

 

* Murphy, Sam and Connors, Sarah.

 

Running Well.

2008. pp48-53

 

 

Furthermore, if you are looking to buy a shoe without assistance, here is some advice as

 

to which type of shoe to choose for your foot type.

 

There are three categories of foot types, based on the amount of inherent stability from

 

the musculoskeletal make-up of the foot:

 

1. Pronators (usually flat feet)

 

2. Supinators (usually high arches)

 

3. Neutral (Somewhere in between)

 

Check out your footprint to help determine which type of arch you have.

Types of Running Shoes

Cushioning shoes

 

 

 

provide elevated shock absorption and minimal medial (arch side) support.

They're best for runners who are mild pronators or supinators. Cushioning shoes are also good for

 

neutral runners during off-pavement runs. Reason: Minor irregularities in surfaces such as dirt roads

 

give feet a little variety from the repetitive, same-spot strikes they typically experience on hard

 

surfaces.

 

 

Stability shoes

 

 

 

help decelerate basic pronation. They're good for neutral runners or those who

exhibit mild to moderate overpronation. They often include a "post" (see Shoe Construction 101,

 

below) in the midsole.

 

 

Motion control shoes

 

 

 

offer features such as stiffer heels or a design built on straighter lasts to

counter overpronation. They're best for runners who exhibit moderate to severe overpronation.

 

Here are some general guidelines:

 

 

Pronators Overpronators Supinators

Foot mechanics

 

 

 

Normal inward roll Excessive inward roll Excessive outward roll

 

Foot shape

 

 

 

Low arch Flat foot to low arch Medium to high arch

 

Shock absorption

in stride

Good Good Poor

Recommended

shoe last

Semi-curved Straight Curved

Recommended

type of shoe

Stability Motion Control Cushioning

Check out your footprint to help determine which type of arch you have.

Types of Running Shoes

Cushioning shoes

 

 

 

provide elevated shock absorption and minimal medial (arch side) support.

They're best for runners who are mild pronators or supinators. Cushioning shoes are also good for

 

neutral runners during off-pavement runs. Reason: Minor irregularities in surfaces such as dirt roads

 

give feet a little variety from the repetitive, same-spot strikes they typically experience on hard

 

surfaces.

 

 

Stability shoes

 

 

 

help decelerate basic pronation. They're good for neutral runners or those who

exhibit mild to moderate overpronation. They often include a "post" (see Shoe Construction 101,

 

below) in the midsole.

 

 

Motion control shoes

 

 

 

offer features such as stiffer heels or a design built on straighter lasts to

counter overpronation. They're best for runners who exhibit moderate to severe overpronation.

 

Here are some general guidelines:

 

 

Pronators Overpronators Supinators

Foot mechanics

 

 

 

Normal inward roll Excessive inward roll Excessive outward roll

 

Foot shape

 

 

 

Low arch Flat foot to low arch Medium to high arch

 

Shock absorption

in stride

Good Good Poor

Recommended

shoe last

Semi-curved Straight Curved

Recommended

type of shoe

Stability Motion Control Cushioning

 

Comments
Blog post currently doesn't have any comments.
 Security code