OrthoVirginia Blog

Hamstring Injuries

Hamstring muscle injuries — such as a "pulled hamstring" are common in athletes who participate in sports that require sprinting, such as baseball, softball, soccer, and basketball.

A pulled hamstring or strain is an injury to one or more of the muscles at the back of the thigh. Most hamstring injuries respond well to simple, nonsurgical treatments.

A hamstring injury can be a pull, a partial tear, or a complete tear.

Muscle strains are graded according to their severity. A grade 1 strain is mild and usually heals readily; a grade 3 strain is a complete tear of the muscle that may take months to heal.

Most hamstring injuries occur in the thick part of the muscle or where the muscle fibers join tendon fibers. In the most severe hamstring injuries, the tendon tears completely away from the bone in the pelvis. It may even pull a piece of bone away with it. This is called an avulsion fracture.

Risk Factors

Several factors can make it more likely you will have a muscle strain, including:

Muscle tightness. Tight muscles are vulnerable to strain. Athletes should follow a year-round program of daily stretching exercises.

Muscle imbalance. When one muscle group is much stronger than its opposing muscle group, the imbalance can lead to a strain. This frequently happens with the hamstring muscles. The quadriceps muscles at the front of the thigh are usually more powerful. During high-speed activities, the hamstring may become fatigued faster than the quadriceps. This fatigue can lead to a strain.

Poor conditioning. If your muscles are weak, they are less able to cope with the stress of exercise and are more likely to be injured.

Muscle fatigue. Fatigue reduces the energy-absorbing capabilities of muscle, making them more susceptible to injury.

Choice of activity. Anyone can experience hamstring strain, but those especially at risk are:

  • Athletes who participate in sports like football, soccer, basketball, baseball, and/or softball
  • Runners or sprinters
  • Dancers
  • Older athletes whose exercise program is primarily walking
  • Adolescent athletes who are still growing

Hamstring strains occur more often in adolescents because bones and muscles do not grow at the same rate. During a growth spurt, a child's bones may grow faster than the muscles. The growing bone pulls the muscle tight. A sudden jump, stretch, or impact can tear the muscle away from its connection to the bone

Symptoms

If you strain your hamstring while sprinting in full stride, you will notice a sudden, sharp pain in the back of your thigh. It will cause you to come to a quick stop, and either hop on your good leg or fall.

Additional symptoms may include:

  • Swelling during the first few hours after injury
  • Bruising or discoloration of the back of your leg or behind your knee over the first few days
  • Weakness in your hamstring that can persist for weeks

 

Treatment

Treatment of hamstring strains will vary depending on the type of injury you have, its severity, and your own needs and expectations.

The goal of any treatment — nonsurgical or surgical — is to help you return to all the activities you enjoy. Following your doctor's treatment plan will restore your abilities faster, and include crutches if needed, ice, NSAIDs if able, compression, rest, and mostly time to heal.

 

Prevention is the most important factor athletes should focus on.

For more information about hamstring injuries, treatment options and recovery, go to:  http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00408

 

Comments
writemyessay
On Monday I have been to my first stretching lesson. I tried hard and worked out a lot . I had better not tried hard that much cause now I have terrible pain in muscles. Seems I have same symptoms which can be found in Hamstring muscle injuries.
2/8/2017 2:11:40 AM

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